SERVICE

Advisory Board of the Veterans’ Success Center at UVU

I grew up in a military family, my brother served in the US Marine corps, I spent 2 years in ROTC, I lived in Japan for 8 years and Thailand for 2 (where I graduated from high school, during the height of the Vietnam war) and have been responsible for people and products in Korea, Hong Kong, Taiwan, Japan, Indonesia, Singapore and Australia. Because of this I have a soft spot in my heart for our veterans and what they have sacrificed to give and protect the many freedoms and liberties we enjoy in the United States. UVU has over 1,000 veterans attending it, more than any other university in Utah. Given our lifestyle many are married and several have children.

The adjustment from military life, especially having served in a ‘war zone’, is challenging at best. PTSD is real – my father suffered from it for over 40 years. It is hard on the veteran and can be even worse on their family.

I’m proud and honored to be able to serve on the Advisory Board of the Veterans’ Success Center at UVU. It is an important way for me to be able to give back a little for all they have given me, and this country. THANK YOU for YOUR Service!!!!

Neighborhood Chair

As a neighborhood chair one of the most frequent responsibilities is to interface with neighbors, developers and the city on issues related to new developments, zoning changes, etc. proposed for property within their neighborhood or adjacent to the neighborhood. The Community Development office is the ‘control center’ of this activity. As the neighborhood chair, I have extensive experience working with the director and staff of Community Development, the Planning Commission, the City Council, and various departments, boards and commissions involved in every step of this process. I’ve conducted and/or attended scores of these meetings. I’ve met with developers, and neighbors to discuss concerns, issues, possible compromises and accommodations and conducted numerous neighborhood and area meetings to deal with things such as: modifying the zoning for a strip mall, putting a drug rehab center next to a seminary building and high school, changing agricultural zoning to allow a senior care facility, and twin homes and or changing it to allow 15-38 units per acre, to granting access through a property to a lighted intersection, to dealing with a builder who uses substandard building materials, to re-plotting residential lots, etc.

Board of Alpine Village

Student housing is an integral part of life in Provo. With the unique living environment required by BYU approved housing, students from the many other colleges and Universities in the Provo/Orem area flock to live in Provo in addition to BYU students. I serve on the board of Alpine Village, which provides housing for approximately 660 students. I have served on this board for over 6 years and am well aware of issues and concerns related to student housing; I’ve had 4 children attending local universities (both BYU and UVU) for most of the past 20 years. I understand the issues students face regrading landlords, etc. as well as the issues landlords face with students who may not treat the property well and neighbors who deal with parking problems, noise, traffic, different quiet times and other lifestyle issues.

UVU’s Aviation Science Board

I served on UVU’s Aviation Science Board at the Provo Airport for 4 years and was the chair my final year. During that time the board raised over $40,000 which was used to provide scholarships, enriching experiences (like an annual trip to FedEx headquarters, where students were able to fly a 777 simulator, visit global operations, Logistics, and air traffic control areas, among other normally off limits sites.) Additionally, I developed both the in class and online core courses in Personal Financial Planning, for students planning to become commercial pilots, preparing them to deal with the massive amount of debt such a career path generates and the unique economic challenges they face throughout their careers. I taught these courses as an adjunct faculty member for 3 years.